Antitrust courts often confront “mixed” conduct that has two contrasting effects, one harmful and the other beneficial. For example, a nationwide agreement not to pay college football players harms the players while benefiting fans of amateur sports. An important tool for analyzing mixed conduct is to compare the action to a hypothesized alternative and to ask whether the alternative action is “less restrictive” and hence less harmful....

In antitrust law, the state action doctrine allows states to take regulatory actions that would otherwise result in violations of the federal antitrust laws. Unfortunately, the Supreme Court has not always provided clear guidance in its state action jurisprudence, and lower courts have expressed frustration with this doctrinally confusing area of antitrust law. There is confusion among the lower courts over the relationship between state...

Increased use of the cloud and its international scope raise signifi­cant challenges to traditional legal authorities that permit access to data stored outside the United States. The resulting stakes are high. This area of law affects a wide range of important matters concerning law enforcement, national security, and civil litigation.

Up until now, however, policymakers in this area have failed to fully appreciate the technological distinctions...

Since its inception more than four decades ago, the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS) has transformed from a relatively powerless monitoring body to a major regulatory hurdle for cross-border deals. This shift has been accompanied by increasing con­cerns from scholars and transacting parties regarding CFIUS’s lack of accountability and transparency. Yet, CFIUS’s scope has only continued to widen, as evidenced by...